Health & Behavior News

A selection of news items written by or involving Division of Health & Behavior faculty members.



March 16, 2015

Brian Elbel, PhD, MPH


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February 26, 2015

Having good full-service supermarkets in poor neighborhoods doesn't mean children will have healthier diets, a new study suggests. "Low-income and ethnic minority neighborhoods are underserved by supermarkets relative to their higher-income counterparts, and it would appear to be logical that increasing availability of healthful foods could improve diets," said study author Brian Elbel, an associate professor of population health at NEW YORK UNIVERSITY in New York City. "However, we do not yet know whether or under what circumstances these stores will improve diet and health," Elbel explained in an NYU LANGONE MEDICAL CENTER news release. "Food choice is complex, and the easy availability of lower-priced processed foods and pervasiveness of junk food marketing have implications for behavior change as well." The researchers surveyed parents and other caregivers of children aged 3 to 10 in two neighborhoods in New York City. One neighborhood had a new, government-sponsored full-service supermarket that offered greater varieties of fresh, affordable fruit and vegetables, while the other did not.


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December 02, 2014

Starting next November, menus in many places where Americans eat will have to list calories. Many had fought for the rule for more than a decade, believing it would be a major weapon in the fight against obesity. Brian D. Elbel, PhD, and his calorie-labeling research are noted.


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December 02, 2014

Last week, the Food and Drug Administration announced that many places where Americans have long eaten in blissful ignorance, like amusement parks, chain restaurants, and movie theaters, will be required to post calorie counts on their menus. Brian Elbel, PhD, and his calorie-labeling research are noted.


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November 27, 2014

Starting next November, menus in many places where Americans eat — like chain restaurants and some movie theaters, convenience stores and amusement parks — will have to list calories. Many had fought for the rule for more than a decade, believing it would be a major weapon in the fight against obesity. But will it? Brian Elbel, PhD, comments on his calorie-labeling research.


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