In the Media

A selection of media items or involving Department of Population Health faculty members.



February 15, 2013

Article by Nicholas W. Stine, MD; Dave A. Chokshi, MD, MSc; Marc N. Gourevitch, MD, MPH

Interest in population health and the promotion of greater collaboration between medical, public health, and social service institutions has surged in recent months. This approach adopts a comprehensive notion of health determinants that are spread across domains of behavioral risk, social and economic circumstances, environmental exposures, and medical care. The balance and effects of many of these determinants, eg, availability of healthy foods, parks and other safe places to play and exercise, exposure to environmental irritants, and safe housing, are specific to geographic locale.


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February 14, 2013

Nicholas Stine, MD, and Dave Chokshi, MD, MSc, writing on behalf of the New York Academy of Medicine Primary Care and Population Health Working Group, discuss different perspectives on the definition of "population health" on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Capital Blog.


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February 07, 2013

Barron H. Lerner, MD, PhD, reviews new strategies that have emerged for dealing with medical mistakes in light of the antiquated screaming matches as displayed on “Monday Morning,” a new medical drama on the TNT network, based on a novel by Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN’s chief medical correspondent and one of the executive producers of the show.


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February 06, 2013

Nicholas Stine, MD, and Dave Chokshi, MD, MSc, writing on behalf of the New York Academy of Medicine Primary Care and Population Health Working Group, discuss different perspectives on the definition of "population health" on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Capital Blog.


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February 04, 2013

Black children with high levels of hormone-altering chemicals used in some shampoos and lotions are more likely to be obese, according to research published today. The study by New York University scientists is the second to link phthalates to obesity in children but the first to use a large sample of children and look for racial disparities. The study was led by Leonardo Trasande, PhD, who is quoted in the article.


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