For Physicians

Overview

Bisphosphonates Medications for Cancer or Osteoporosis

Corrective Jaw/Orthognathic Surgery

Dental Implants

Facial Swelling/Salivary Gland Disease

Nerve-related Damage

Oral Cancer and Pathology

Outpatient Ambulatory Anesthesia

Pediatric Care

Trauma

Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome (TMJ)

Wisdom Tooth Extractions


Bisphosphonates Medications for Cancer or Osteoporosis

Bisphosphonates medications (e.g., Zometa, Aredia, Fosamax) have been associated with a condition referred to as osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ) that involves a breakdown and death of the jaw bones.

Questions You Should Ask

  • Do you see a dentist regularly?
  • Do you experience oral pain, loosening of your teeth, or numbness of your jaw?
  • Do you require oral surgery? (e.g., dental extractions, dental implants)

Whom to Contact

Kenneth E. Fleisher, DDS

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Corrective Jaw/Orthognathic Surgery

This surgery is performed on the bones of the face and jaws in order to correct skeletal and dental irregularities, including misalignment of jaws and teeth, which in turn can improve chewing, speaking, breathing and facial imbalances. This type of surgery is both to improve jaw function and facial esthetics.

Questions You Should Ask

  • Do you have difficulty chewing or biting food?
  • Do you wish you looked better?
  • Are you unable to bring your teeth together?
  • Do you want to have more balanced facial appearance from the front or side?
  • Do you have a gummy smile, weak/receding chin, or protruding jaw?
  • Do you have an inability to make the lips meet without straining?

Whom to Contact

Robert S. Glickman, DMD
Vasiliki Karlis, DMD, MD

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Dental Implants

Patients who have gaps in their teeth, are missing teeth entirely, or who currently wear dentures may be interested in dental implants.

Questions You Should Ask

  • Are you having trouble eating because of gaps, missing teeth or poorly sized dentures?
  • Would you like to replace your missing teeth?
  • Are you interested in having dentures that don’t come out of your mouth?
  • Would you like to replace your dentures?
  • Do your dentures slip or move around – are they stable?

Whom to Contact

Robert S. Glickman, DMD
Vasiliki Karlis, DMD, MD
Michael D. Turner, DDS, MD
Kenneth E. Fleisher, DDS

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Facial Swelling/Salivary Gland Disease

Common examples of patient complaints include swelling in the face (with or without pain) and mouth pain when they are about to eat.

Questions You Should Ask

  • Do you have a dry mouth?
  • Do you have salivary stones?
  • Do your salivary glands swell?

Whom to Contact

Michael D. Turner, DDS, MD

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Nerve-related Damage

Patients complaining of numbness in the lip, chin, and/or tongue may have encountered nerve damage during a dental procedure.

Whom to Contact

Michael D. Turner, DDS, MD

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Oral Cancer and Pathology

Common examples of patient complaints include lesions, red patches, white patches, or ulcers/sores in the mouth that won’t heal.

Questions You Should Ask

  • Have you ever had an oral cancer exam?
  • Do you have any red or white patches in your mouth or sores that won’t heal?
  • Do you have any lumps, bumps or lesions in your mouth?

Whom to Contact

Robert S. Glickman, DMD
Vasiliki Karlis, DMD, MD
Michael D. Turner, DDS, MD
Kenneth E. Fleisher, DDS

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Outpatient Ambulatory Anesthesia

Patients are often apprehensive about even the simplest oral surgery procedures, so we have a special program with multiple levels of sedation anesthesia. All outpatient procedures within the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery are done using mild to deep level sedation.

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Pediatric Care

We provide treatment for children who are “tongue-tied”, have speech problems, need dental extractions, or require other oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures. Our pediatric dentists are restorative dentists and refer to NYU for all surgical procedures.

Whom to Contact

Vasiliki Karlis, DMD, MD

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Trauma

We provide both primary and secondary reconstruction of trauma to the face, including broken jaw bones, broken nasal bones and facial fractures. We can help patients who are unhappy with the way an injury has healed and offer referrals to the Division of Plastic Surgery for additional treatment not related to the face’s skeletal structure.

Whom to Contact

Robert S. Glickman, DMD
Vasiliki Karlis, DMD, MD
Michael D. Turner, DDS, MD
Kenneth E. Fleisher, DDS

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Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

These conditions may be managed by oral appliances or surgery of the palate, tongue and/or jaws. Oral appliances are used to reposition the jaw during sleep. Patients who do not tolerate nonsurgical treatments (e.g., CPAP, appliances, weight loss) may be candidates for surgical procedures to increase upper airway patency. Surgical strategies include identifying anatomical risk factors (e.g., large tongue, posterior jaw position, small chin) utilizing specialized x-rays.

Questions You Should Ask

  • Do you experience loud snoring?
  • Does your snoring wake you up?
  • Do you experience gasping or choking during sleep?
  • Do you complain of disrupted sleep?
  • Do you experience daytime sleepiness and fatigue?
  • Do you have a dry mouth, sore throat or headache in the morning?
  • Do you have high blood pressure?

Whom to Contact

Kenneth E. Fleisher, DDS

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Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome (TMJ)

Common examples of patient complaints include pain in the front of the ear, earaches, or an inability to open the jaw wide enough. Patients may also complain of waking up with a sore jaw, clicking and/or popping in the jaw joint, locking of the jaw (either opened or closed), facial pain, headaches, or clenching/grinding/gritting their teeth.

Questions You Should Ask

  • Has a doctor checked your ears to confirm there is no problem with the ear canal?
  • Do you have TMJ problems?

Whom to Contact

Robert S. Glickman, DMD

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Wisdom Tooth Extractions

Impacted teeth can be painful and lead to serious infections. In addition, they can crowd or damage adjacent teeth or roots. Some impacted wisdom teeth can be associated with jaw cysts and tumors. If a patient complains of pain in the jaw specifically related to the wisdom teeth, it is important to determine the urgency of their condition. It is essential to find out the status of their wisdom teeth, as well as if they are experiencing pain and swelling. You may also want to discuss the possibility of sedation with the patient.

Whom to Contact

Robert S. Glickman, DMD
Vasiliki Karlis, DMD, MD
Michael D. Turner, DDS, MD
Kenneth E. Fleisher, DDS

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