Systems & Computational Biomedicine PhD Training Program Curriculum

Systems & Computational Biomedicine PhD Training Program Systems & Computational Biomedicine PhD Training Program Curriculum
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Systems & Computational Biomedicine PhD Training Program Systems & Computational Biomedicine PhD Training Program Curriculum

NYU School of Medicine’s Systems and Computational Biomedicine PhD Training Program includes coursework, seminars, practica, and research.

Core Courses

Of the courses offered to all PhD candidates at the Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, students in the systems and computational biomedicine training program often take the following. For more information, view our PhD course catalog.

Topics in Molecular Biology
Introduction to Research
Methods in Quantitative Biology
Topics in Bioinformatics
Systems and Computational Biology Seminar

Recommended Elective Courses

The following elective courses are suggested for candidates in our program.

Machine Learning
Next Generation Sequencing Informatics
Proteomic Informatics
Deep Learning for Biomedical Data

Seminars

Each month, informatics faculty present seminars that provide students an opportunity to learn about research in the field. All students are expected to attend.

The Works in Progress Series, which current students can learn more information about by logging into our student community with their Kerberos ID, hosts student presentations on systems and computational biomedicine. Students present ongoing research, receive feedback from peers and faculty, and learn about other research projects.

Research

The principal element of our doctoral program is the completion of a substantial, scholarly, original, and independent research study. The final basis for the conferral of the doctorate is the successful presentation and defense of a dissertation on this research before an examining committee.

Typical Curriculum

You work with a mentoring faculty member to create a plan that reflects your experience and research interests. The following represents a typical curriculum.

Year One: Fall Semester

Topics in Molecular Biology
Introduction to Research
Methods in Quantitative Biology
Systems and Computational Biology Seminar

Year One: Spring Semester

Topics in Bioinformatics
Ethics
Elective courses
Systems and Computational Biology Seminar

Year Two: Fall Semester

Introduction to Health Informatics
Elective courses
Systems and Computational Biology Seminar
Systems and Computational Biology Research

Year Two: Spring Semester

Grant Writing
Elective courses
Systems and Computational Biology Seminar
Systems and Computational Biology Research

Year Three and Beyond

Individual Development Plan
Systems and Computational Biology Seminar
Systems and Computational Biology Research

Current students can download forms for the qualifying exam, committee meeting reports, and important information on thesis defenses and graduation by logging into our student community with their Kerberos ID.

Other Requirements

Beyond coursework and research, you participate in activities that include an annual retreat.

Annual Retreat

Each year, the Systems and Computational Biomedicine PhD Training Program hosts a faculty and student retreat. During half-day work sessions, students present their work and plan future endeavors. Following each work session, students can socialize with peers and faculty and receive feedback on their presentations. All students are required to attend.

Mentoring

Kelly Ruggles, PhD, graduate advisor, and David Fenyo, PhD, program director, provide overall guidance to all students in the program.

After completing two to three lab rotations, you select an academic mentor, who is the primary advisor for your thesis, with the help of the graduate advisor and administrative director.

The academic program committee oversees execution of the curriculum and monitors individual student progress. In addition, the committee gives feedback on this progress to both student and mentor. Corrective guidance is offered if needed. The committee also provides an annual program evaluation report to the academic director and administrative director of the program.

Each student is assigned an individual mentoring committee, made up of at least three Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences faculty members, including at least one from the systems and computational biomedicine program. The mentoring committee guides the student on research projects.