Section for Global Health Research

At NYU Langone’s Section for Global Health in the Department of Population Health, we conduct transdisciplinary research to improve population health and reduce disease burden.

Cardiovascular Disease

Countries in sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing an epidemic of cardiovascular disease, driven by rapidly increasing rates of hypertension. This is exacerbated by a lack of healthcare human resources. The region bears 24 percent of the global disease burden, yet it has only 3 percent of the global health workforce. Patients face barriers to managing the condition, including poor access to care and high out-of-pocket costs.

Our work involves developing, implementing, and evaluating interventions that respond to these resource limits. This includes mHealth interventions, developing novel care delivery models, strengthening referral networks across the health system and improving access to essential cardiovascular medications. Our novel healthcare delivery models are based on the World Health Organization (WHO) task-shifting strategy, a cost-effective way to address the physician shortage by training nurses and other health workers to assess hypertension and provide education and behavioral counseling. Learn more about our cardiovascular disease research grants.

Cancer

Seventy percent of the 8.8 million global cancer deaths worldwide occur in low- and middle-income countries, according to WHO. Women in these countries are disproportionately impacted. They constitute 85 percent of cervical cancer cases and deaths around the world, a number that is expected to rise to 95 percent by 2030. Yet cervical cancer is largely a preventable disease.

We work to improve global cancer control research by evaluating population health interventions and advocating for policy change. We are currently studying a program that trains local, nonphysician healthcare providers and community health workers to use mobile technology to screen for cervical and breast cancer. Learn more about our cancer research grants.