Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship in Rehabilitation Research

The Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship is funded through the Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training (ARRT) program, National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR). The fellowship is designed to train psychology postdoctoral fellows in the skills necessary to become independent clinical researchers, specifically in the areas of brain-related illness and injury and neuropsychological rehabilitation. The focus is on the assessment and treatment of adults with neurocognitive disorders, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, and other conditions that impact the brain and cognitive functioning. Innovative neurorehabilitation intervention methods, especially those related to problem solving and emotional self-regulation, are areas of interest, along with the impact of diversity and demographic factors on outcome, including race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, and socioeconomic status.

Fellows participate in a variety of collaborative clinical research projects within Rusk Rehabilitation, including Rusk TBI Model Systems at NYU (Tamara Bushnik, PI) and Enhancing Emotional Regulation Post-TBI: Probing Neural Circuitry with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (Preeti Raghavan, PI). In addition, fellows participate in federally-funded collaborative clinical research projects with other departments; current collaborations with Radiology include Quantitative MRI and 1H-MRS in Traumatic Brain Injury (Yvonne Lui, PI) and Role of Dysmyelination in Psychotic Spectrum Disorders (Mariana Lazar, PI).

Projects

Rusk Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training (ARRT) Postdoctoral Fellowship (Joseph Rath, Project Director) is a NIDILRR-funded five-year grant designed to train psychology postdoctoral fellows in advanced rehabilitation research techniques. Fellows collaborate on established clinical-research projects and develop and conduct independent research projects from inception to dissemination. Fellows also have the opportunity to participate in ongoing clinical care of adult outpatients, including neuropsychological assessment, cognitive remediation, and psychotherapy. Applications are accepted starting in December each year for full-time two-year positions that begin the following September.

Quantitative MRI and 1H-MRS in Traumatic Brain Injury (Yvonne Lui, PI) is a National Institute on Neurological Disability and Stroke (NINDS)-funded collaboration with the Department of Radiology. The goals are to describe and quantify thalamic abnormalities following mild TBI in a well-characterized patient cohort and determine how these alterations correlate with clinical symptoms and neuropsychological tests in a longitudinal study. Dr. Rath is a co-investigator on this study.

Role of Dysmyelination in Psychotic Spectrum Disorders (Mariana Lazar, PI) is a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded collaboration with the Department of Radiology.  The goals of this study are to identify structural sequelae of working memory deficits in individuals with psychosis through diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI). Dr. Bertisch is a co-investigator on this study.

Cognitive Rehabilitation for Gulf War Illness (Lisa McAndrew, PI) is a collaboration between  the War Related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC) of the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System in East Orange, NJ, and Rusk Rehabilitation. The goal of this study, funded through the Department of Veteran Affairs, is to evaluate the effectiveness of problem-solving cognitive rehabilitation interventions developed at Rusk Rehabilitation for treating the diverse cognitive and emotional symptoms experienced by Veterans with Gulf War Illness. Dr. Rath is a co-investigator on this study.

Community Reintegration, Functional Outcomes and QOL after Upper and Lower Extremity Trauma within the BADER Consortium (Steven Stanhope/David Tulsky, PIs) is a Department of Defense (DoD) funded initiative designed to 1) evaluate, catalog, and make recommendations for selection and utilization of existing Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) measures for individuals with amputations and limb preservation procedures, and 2) develop new PRO measures for use across Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation (BADER) Consortium military treatment facilities.  Dr. Bertisch is site-PI on this study.

Pattern Classification Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Traumatic Brain Injury (Yvonne Lui, PI) is an NINDS-funded collaboration with the Department of Radiology. The goal is to bring novel MRI techniques to clinical use, using machine learning to combine objective MRI findings with clinical information to predict long-term outcome. Such a tool would be an extremely powerful clinical tool to identify at-risk patients for early intervention. Additionally, this research will identify the most clinically relevant MRI metrics, thereby pointing the way to novel therapeutic pathways. Dr. Rath is a co-investigator on this study.

Publications

  • Bertisch, H., Krellman, J., Bergquist, T., Dreer, L. Ellois, V., & Bushnik, T. (in press) Characteristics of firearm brain injury survivors in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) National Database: A comparison of assault and self-inflicted injury survivors. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
  • Bertisch, H., Rivara, F. P., Kisala, P. A., Wang, J., Yeates, K. O., Durbin, D.........& Tulsky, D. S.  (in press).  Psychometric evaluation of pediatric and parent-proxy Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System and the Neurology and Traumatic Brain Injury Quality of Life Measurement item banks in pediatric brain injury.  Quality of Life Research.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28271316
  • Rath, J. F., Fox, L. M., & Childs, A. (in press). Brief Symptom Inventory.  In J. S. Kreutzer, J. DeLuca, & B. Caplan (Eds.), Encyclopedia of clinical neuropsychology (2nd ed.). New York: Springer.
  • Greenberg, L. M., Litke, D. R., Ray, K., Rath, J. F., Pigeon, W. R., Helmer, D. A., Anastasides, N., & McAndrew, L. M. (2017). Developing a problem-solving treatment for Gulf War Illness: Cognitive rehabilitation of veterans with complex post-deployment health concerns. Clinical Social Work Journal, 1-10.
  • Kim, S., Zemon, V., Rath, J. F., Picone, M., Gromisch, E. S., Glubo, H., Smith-Wexler, L. & Foley, F. W. (2017).  Screening instruments for the early detection of cognitive impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis.  International Journal of MS Care, 19, 1-10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28243180
  • Rath, J. F., Bertisch, H., & Elliott, T. R. (2017). Psychologists specializing in rehabilitation psychology. In R. Sternberg (Ed.), Career paths in psychology: Where your degree can take you (3rd ed., pp. 227-243). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Kesinger, M. R., Juengst, S. B., Bertisch, H., Niemeier, J. P., Krellman, J., Pugh, M. J.,... & Wagner, A. K. (2016). Acute trauma factor associations with suicidality across the first 5 years after moderate-to-severe with traumatic brain injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97, 1301-1308. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26987622
  • Bertisch, H., Kalpakjian, C. Z., Kisala, P. A., & Tulsky, D. S. (2015). Measuring positive affect and well-being after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Positive affect and Well-Being bank and short form. Journal Spinal Cord Medicine, 38, 356-365. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26010970
  • Cho, Y. S., & Sohlberg, M. M. (2015). Training adults with brain injury how to help-seek when lost: A pilot study. Brain Impairment, 16, 1-14. doi: 10.1017/BrImp.2015.4
  • Li, X., Black, M., Xia S., Zhan, C., Bertisch, H. C., Branch, C. A., & DeLisi L. E. (2015).  Subcortical structure alterations impact language processing in individuals with schizophrenia and those at high genetic risk.  Schizophrenia Research, 169, 76-82. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26386898
  • Kim, S., Rath, J. F., McCraty, R., Zemon, V., Cavallo, M. M., & Foley, F. W. (2015). Heart rate variability biofeedback, self-regulation, and severe brain injury. Biofeedback, 43(1), 6-14. doi: 10.5298/1081-5937-43.1.10P
  • Lee, Y. S. C., Suchday, S., & Wylie-Rosett, J. (2015). Social support and networks and cardiovascular responses following provocation among Chinese Americans. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 17, 543-552. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24288021
  • Lee, Y. S. C., Ashman, T.A., Suzuki, W., & Shang, A. (2014). Brief report: Effects of exercise and self-affirmation intervention after traumatic brain injury. Neurorehabilitation, 35, 57-65. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24990010
  • Bertisch, H., Long, C., Rath, J. F., Rashid, T., & Ashman, T. A. (2014). Positive psychology in rehabilitation medicine: A brief report. NeuroRehabilitation 34, 573-85. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24448878
  • Rath, J. F., Bertisch, H., & Elliott, T. R. (2014). Groups in behavioral health and medical settings. In J. L. DeLucia-Waack, C. R. Kalodner, & M. T. Riva (Eds.), Handbook of group counseling and psychotherapy (2nd ed., pp. 340-350). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  • Bertisch, H., Long, C., Langenbahn, D. M., Rath, J. F., Diller, L., & Ashman, T. A. (2013). Anxiety as a primary predictor of functional impairment after acquired brain injury: A brief report. Rehabilitation Psychology, 58, 429–435. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24295531
  • Zhou, Y., Kierans, A., Kenul, D., Ge, Y., Rath, J. F., Reaume, J., Grossman, R., & Lui, Y. (2013). Longitudinal regional brain volume changes in mild traumatic brain injury patients. Radiology, 267, 880-890. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23481161
  • Kim, S., Zemon, V., Cavallo, M. M., Rath, J. F., McCraty, R., & Foley, F. W.  (2013). Heart rate variability biofeedback, executive functioning, and chronic brain injury. Brain Injury, 27, 209-222. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23384218
  • Lee, Y. S. C., Suchday, S., & Wylie-Rosett, J. (2012). Perceived social support, coping styles, and Chinese immigrants' cardiovascular responses to stress. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 19, 174-185. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21472482
  • Rath, J. F., & Elliott, T. R. (2012). Psychological models in rehabilitation psychology. In P. Kennedy (Ed.), Oxford handbook of rehabilitation psychology (pp. 32-46). New York: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199733989.013.0003
  • Elliott, T. R., & Rath, J. F. (2011). Rehabilitation psychology. In E. M. Altmaier & J. I. Hansen (Eds.), Oxford handbook of counseling psychology (pp. 679-702). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Bertisch, H., Rath, J. F., Langenbahn, D. M., Sherr, R. L., & Diller, L. (2011). Group treatment in acquired brain injury rehabilitation.  Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 36, 264-277. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ949112
  • Rath, J. F., Hradil, A. L., Litke, D. R., & Diller, L. (2011). Clinical applications of problem-solving research in neuropsychological rehabilitation: Addressing the subjective experience of cognitive deficits in outpatients with acquired brain injury. Rehabilitation Psychology, 56, 320-328. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22121939
  • Bertisch, H., Li, D., Hoptman, M., & DeLisi, L. E.  (2010). Heritability estimates for cognitive factors and brain white matter integrity as markers of schizophrenia. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 153B, 885-894. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20052692
  • Bertisch, H., Mesen-Fainardi, A., Martin, M. V., Pérez –Vargas, V.,  Vargas-Rodríguez, T., Delgado, G., …and the  Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Research Consortium (2009).  Neuropsychological performance as endophenotypes in extended schizophrenia families from the Central Valley of Costa Rica.  Psychiatric Genetics, 19, 45-52. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19125108
  • Bertisch, H. C., Fava, J., Kattan, A., & DeLisi, L. E. (2008).  Preliminary neuropsychological findings in individuals at high genetic risk for schizophrenia.  Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 2, 45-29. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21352131
  • Rath, J. F., Langenbahn, D. M., Simon, D., Sherr, R. L., Fletcher, J., & Diller, L. (2004). The construct of problem solving in higher level neuropsychological assessment and rehabilitation. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 19, 613-635. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15271407
  • Rath, J. F., Hennessy, J. J., & Diller, L. (2003). Social problem solving and community integration in post- acute rehabilitation outpatients with traumatic brain injury. Rehabilitation Psychology, 48, 137-144. doi: 10.1037/0090-5550.48.3.137
  • Rath, J. F., Simon, D., Langenbahn, D. M., Sherr, R. L., & Diller, L. (2003). Group treatment of problem-solving deficits in outpatients with traumatic brain injury: A randomized outcome study. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 13, 461-488. doi: 10.1080/09602010343000039
  • Rath, J. F., Simon, D., Langenbahn, D. M., Sherr, R. L., & Diller, L. (2000). Measurement of problem-solving deficits in adults with acquired brain damage. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 15, 724-733. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15271407

Team  Members

Joseph F. Rath, PhD, is the associate director for psychology research and training director, Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship in Rehabilitation Research. Currently funded through grants from NIDILRR, NIH, and the Department of Veterans Affairs, his major research interests include integrating cognitive and emotional interventions in neuropsychological rehabilitation, use of advanced neuroimaging techniques in TBI, training psychologists with disabilities, health disparities, and diversity issues in rehabilitation psychology. He can be contacted via email at joseph.rath@med.nyu.edu.

Hilary Bertisch, PhD, ABPP, is a senior psychologist, clinical assistant professor in Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, and a board certified clinical neuropsychologist. Funded through grants from CDC, NIMH, and DoD, her major research interests include instrument development, outcome assessment, resilience, and comorbidities within TBI populations. She can be contacted via email at hilary.bertisch@nyumc.org.

Young Susan Cho, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a research assistant professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and a licensed speech-language pathologist. Her research focuses on the development and implementation of interventions to address deficits in social problem solving. She is particularly interested in novel interventions to improve help-seeking and wayfinding in individuals with acquired brain injury. She can be contacted or via email at young.cho@nyumc.org.

Yuen Shan Christine Lee, PhD, is a graduate of the ARRT psychology postdoctoral fellowship in rehabilitation research. She is a senior psychologist and clinical instructor at Rusk Rehabilitation. Her research interests include concussion, positive psychology, health disparities, and culturally-sensitive interventions for individuals with ABI. She can be contacted via email at christineyuenshan.lee@nyumc.org.

Heather Glubo, PhD, is a graduate of the ARRT psychology postdoctoral fellowship in rehabilitation research. Her research interests include health disparities and diversity issues within rehabilitation psychology. She can be contacted via email at heather.glubo@nyumc.org.

Lucia Smith-Wexler, PhD, is a graduate of the ARRT psychology postdoctoral fellowship in rehabilitation research. She is a staff psychologist, providing Spanish-language services at Rusk Rehabilitation. Her research interests include multicultural neuropsychological assessment and rehabilitation, cognitive remediation in acquired brain injury, and diet and nutrition after brain injury. She can be contacted at lucia.smith@nyumc.org.

Amanda Childs, PhD, is a graduate of the ARRT psychology postdoctoral fellowship in rehabilitation research. She is a staff psychologist at Rusk Rehabilitation, whose research interests include concussion outcome, TBI, emotional regulation, and weight change following brain injury. She can be contacted at amanda.childs@nyumc.org.

Valerie Ellois, PhD, is a second-year ARRT psychology postdoctoral fellow in rehabilitation research. Her research interests include problematic substance use, emotional dysregulation, suicidality, and health disparities in acquired brain injury. She can be contacted at valerie.ellois@nyumc.org.

N. Erkut Kucukboyaci, PhD, is a first-year ARRT psychology postdoctoral fellow. A recent graduate of the SDSU/UCSD Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, his research interests center around application of neuroimaging, advanced quantitative models, and neuropsychological approaches to study cognitive and psychosocial treatment outcomes and neuroplasticity for patients with acquired brain injury. He can be contacted via email at nuri.kucukboyaci@nyumc.org.

Coralynn Long, MS, is a psychology assistant at Rusk Rehabilitation and a doctoral candidate at the CUNY Graduate Center’s Educational Psychology program specializing in Quantitative Research Methods. Her research interests include TBI assessment and outcome scale development using item response theory. She can be contacted via email at coralynn.long@nyumc.org.

Contact Information

Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship in Rehabilitation Research
Rusk Rehabilitation
240 East 38th Street, ACC 17th Floor
New York, NY 10016
212-263-6183
joseph.rath@med.nyu.edu