Cognitive Neurology Postdoctoral Research Positions | NYU Langone Health

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Center for Cognitive Neurology Research Cognitive Neurology Postdoctoral Research Positions

Cognitive Neurology Postdoctoral Research Positions

NYU Langone’s Center for Cognitive Neurology is pleased to offer National Institutes of Health (NIH) T32–funded postdoctoral positions in neurodegenerative research. The goal of this program is to train scientists and clinician–scientists to be future leaders in the field of neurodegenerative research and the aging brain.

Trainees are paired with mentors or mentoring teams made up of clinician–scientists as well as basic and translational scientists from a variety of disciplines throughout NYU Langone, NYU, and the Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research. Mentors coach trainees in topics such as presentation skills, developing publications, and writing grant proposals. Trainees also work with their mentors on the fundamentals of neurodegenerative disease, rigorous research methodology, clinical approaches, and statistical analysis.

A salary commensurate with current National Research Service Award (NRSA) funding levels, plus fringe benefits and a $2,500 allowance for training-related expenses, are provided for one year. A second year of support may be offered, pending a satisfactory progress report.

Eligibility Requirements

To receive a T32 appointment, you must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident; hold a doctoral degree (MD, PhD, or MD/PhD) or equivalent by the start date of the appointment; and be engaged in basic, translational, or clinical research on neurodegenerative diseases under the mentorship of an NYU or NYU Grossman School of Medicine faculty member.

To apply, please email Alexandra Freund at alexandra.freund@nyulangone.org.

This Postdoctoral Research Training Program in Neurodegenerative Disorders and the Aging Brain is funded through award number T32AG052909 from the National Institute on Aging, under the direction of Thomas M. Wisniewski, MD, and Helen E. Scharfman, PhD.