Past Pilot Projects

The Relationship between Helicobacter pylori and Other Viral and Chronic Diseases

PI:  Guillermo Perez-Perez, ScD (2008-2010)

The specific aims of the study are to:

  • Examine the relationship between helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and hepatitis B in Chinese and Korean populations
  • Determine the nature of the relationship between H pylori and hypertension among Filipino populations 

Emerging Asian & Pacific Islander Immigrant Populations in Smaller Cities

PI:  John Chin, PhD (2007-2009)

The specific aims of the study are to:

To identify the smaller cities that have experienced rapid growth of API immigrants in the last 10 years using census and other publicly available data.

Using publicly available data, to describe the key patterns of health needs, health access, and health disparities among API immigrants in smaller cities and the sociodemographic and locational characteristics of the cities that are associated with these patterns.  Sociodemographic and locational characteristics include population demographics, size, density, and growth; city location, housing availability, and major industries. Back to top.

Mental Health Problems in Asian American Children

PI: Keng-Yen Huang, PhD (2007-2009)

This study aims to investigate mental health problems in preschool-age Asian American children as a first step toward the provision of culturally informed prevention programs intended to reduce health disparities for Asian American families. This study investigates risk and protective factors and the symptom presentation in two important subgroups of Asian Americans—South Asian Americans (e.g., Indian, Pakistani) and East Asian American (e.g., Chinese, Japanese, Korean). There is a dearth of literature on mental health problems in young Asian American children, and virtually no studies focusing on South-Asian Americans, even though this is an increasingly large subpopulation in the U.S.

The specific aims of this study are:

To evaluate the psychometric properties of measures of child mental health problems and potential risk and protective factors (e.g., parenting practices, cultural adaptation, parental depression) in South Asian (SA) and East Asian (EA) subpopulations. Psychometric properties of measures in Asian American children and families will be considered in their own right and also relative to other ethnic minority populations (e.g., Black American and Latino American). 

  • To provide descriptive information on child mental health problems and potential risk and protective factors in SA and EA families relative to other pan-ethnic groups (i.e., Black American, Latino American).
  • To examine pathways for childhood mental health problems in young SA and EA children, including exploring the role of parental culture adaptation, parenting practices, parental psychological functioning, and socio-demographic factors.
  • To compare psychopathology models for Asian Americans with models for other ethnic minority groups. 

The Roles of Family Support, Religion, and Social Capital in HIV Risk-Taking Behaviors of Asian American Men Who Have Sex With Men

PI:  Nicholas Gavin, MD candidate (2006-2008)

The purpose of this research is to look at the relationship between social supports (including volunteering and group activities) and sexual risk-taking behavior.

The specific aims of the study are to:

  • Examine the interplay between supporting factors and risk-taking behaviors;
  • Provide new information to care-providers CBOs, and advocates;
  • Assess the possible correlation between depression and risk-taking behaviors; and
  • Determine differences between immigrant and American born Asian American with respect to risk-taking and prevention behaviors.

Preventive Intervention Response in Asian American Preschoolers and their Mothers: Comparisons with African American, Latino and Caucasian Preschoolers

PI:  Laurie Miller Brotman, PhD (2006-2007)

The overall goal of this pilot work was to inform prevention efforts with ethnically diverse children and families.

The specific aims of the study were:

  • To examine recruitment and attendance rates, satisfaction of program participation, and barriers to participation among Asian American families independently and relative to African American, Hispanic, and European American families from similar socioeconomic backgrounds and neighborhoods; and
  • To evaluate racial/ethnic group differences among Asian Americans, African Americans, Hispanics and European Americans in intervention outcomes (including parenting, child functioning, and problem behavior outcomes).

Anxiety and Depression in Asian American Young Children

PI:  Keng-Yen Huang, PhD (2006-2007)

This pilot study was designed as a first step to explore anxiety and depression and risk and protective factors in young Asian American children relative to children from other racial/ethnic groups.

Specific aims of the study were to:

  • Examine rates of anxiety and depression among Asian American preschoolers independently and relative to African American, Hispanic, and European American preschoolers from similar socioeconomic backgrounds and neighborhoods;
  • Assess the psychometric properties of a standard assessment tool for evaluating mental health problems in preschoolers (Behavior Assessment System for Children; BASC, Reynolds & Kamphaus, 1992) within Asian Americans and relative to African Americans, Hispanics and European Americans;
  • Evaluate relations between known risk and protective factors (i.e., family stressors, structure, support, acculturation, socioeconomic status, religion, maternal depression, parenting practices, and child characteristics) and child anxiety and depressive symptoms in Asian American preschoolers; and
  • Evaluate racial/ethnic group differences among Asian Americans, African Americans, Hispanics and European Americans in risk and protective factors and relations between risk and protective factors and anxiety and depressive symptoms in preschoolers. 

 

Adapting an Organizational Assessment Scale of Cultural Competency in Behavioral Health Care Settings for Use with Chinese Populations

PI:  Carole Seigel, PhD (2006-2007)

The Cultural Competency Assessment Scale is an organizational level assessment instrument that measures the cultural competence of a behavioral health care organization.

The specific aims of this project are to:

  • Adapt the Cultural Competency Assessment Scale (CCAS) to be suitable for use in outpatient mono-cultural behavioral health care agencies that serve the predominant New York City Asian Pacific American groups that have substantial members with limited English proficiency, namely Chinese groups;
  • Adapt the Cultural Competency Assessment Scale (CCAS) to be suitable for use in outpatient multi-cultural behavioral health care agencies serving substantial numbers of the Asian American target groups in addition to white or other subgroups;
  • To identify the elements of the scale that may need adaptation for other Asian Pacific American subgroups in general; and
  • To pilot test the adapted scales in at a mono-cultural behavioral health care settings, a multicultural behavioral health care settings and an outpatient health care settings; and 5) to write and submit a competing continuation grant to an existing grant to develop the psychometric properties of the newly adapted scales.

Vietnamese American Community Health and Resource Assessment (VCHNA)

PI:  Douglas Nam Le (2006-2008)

The goal of this study is to effectively assess the health needs and resources of the Vietnamese community living in New York City.

The specific aims of the study are to:

  • Identify the health issues of concern for this community;
  • Determine the resources available; and
  • Assess the best approaches to meet community needs.

The Roles of Family Support, Religion, and Social Capital in HIV Risk-Taking Behaviors of Asian American Men Who Have Sex With Men

PI:  Nicholas Gavin, MD candidate (2006-2008)

The purpose of this research is to look at the relationship between social supports (including volunteering and group activities) and sexual risk-taking behavior.

The specific aims of the study are to:

  • Examine the interplay between supporting factors and risk-taking behaviors;
  • Provide new information to care-providers CBOs, and advocates;
  • Assess the possible correlation between depression and risk-taking behaviors; and
  • Determine differences between immigrant and American born Asian American with respect to risk-taking and prevention behaviors.

Cancer and Communication among Asian Americans

 PI:  Francesca Gany, MD, MPH (2004-2005)

The goal of the Cancer and Communication Pilot Project (CCPP) was to study the errors in medical interpreting in cancer care and their potential clinical consequences.

The specific aims of the project were to:

  • Develop and refine a specific “error analysis tool” for application in the detection and characterization of errors made in interpretation during language discordant cancer care encounters;
  • Develop detailed scripts for simulated interpreted language discordant cancer care encounters with wide application in research on limited English proficiency patients and their cancer care;
  • Determine the frequency, types, and potential clinical consequences of errors made in interpretation during language discordant cancer care encounters; and 
  • Compare the rates and potential clinical consequences of errors made in interpretation during language discordant cancer care encounters using untrained or trained interpreters.