Available Positions for Postdoctoral Fellows

Postdoctoral Training Available Positions for Postdoctoral Fellows
Researcher in Lab with Pipette
Postdoctoral Training Available Positions for Postdoctoral Fellows

At NYU School of Medicine, we frequently post new opportunities for postdoctoral fellows to join our team of world-class biomedical investigators.

If you are interested in applying for an available position, please contact the principal investigator directly using the contact information included with the position listing. You might find additional postdoc opportunities by searching the NYU School of Medicine website for a researcher or department that interests you. There may be additional research opportunities available.

NYU School of Medicine researchers who have an available postdoctoral position they would like to add to this list can submit the new postdoctoral position submission form.

Current postdocs nearing the end of their appointment can log into the postdoc community using their Kerberos ID to browse a list of job openings. Faculty and administrators from outside institutions who wish to add a job opening to this list can do so by submitting a career opportunity form.

Current Postdoctoral Openings

NYU School of Medicine is an equal opportunity employer committed to fostering diversity for postdoctoral fellows in the workplace. The following positions offer competitive salaries, excellent benefits, and eligibility for student housing.

The Role of TGF Beta and Inflammation in Aneurysm Production—October 1, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of Daniel Rifkin, MD, at NYU Langone’s Department of Cell Biology. The Rifkin Laboratory is seeking an ambitious and motivated PhD to investigate the role of TGF beta and inflammation in the pathogenesis of thoracic aneurysms. 

In animals and humans, a number of mutations of proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) result in dilation and eventual rupture of the thoracic aorta. The most common of these conditions is Marfan syndrome, an autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1, a large multidomain, ubiquitous ECM protein. The one other known protein group in the fibrillin family are the latent transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBP). 

As the name implies, the LTBPs bind TGFβ. The fact that fibrillin-1 binds to LTBP-1 led to the suggestion that abnormalities in fibrillin-1 might affect TGFβ function. Indeed, lowering TGFβ levels in Marfan syndrome mice decreases the severity of aortic aneurysms. We have found that loss of LTBP-3 in Marfan mice also prevents dilation and protects against rupture. Additionally, the loss of Rag2 in Marfan mice blocks rupture but does not inhibit dilation. 

Our current research is focused on the molecular role of LTBP-3 in aneurysm production, the role of the immune system in vessel rupture, and early and late contributions of LTBPs and TGFβ to blood vessel physiology. 

We are currently using mouse genetics, as well as cell, molecular, and genomic approaches to identify unique molecular targets of TGFβ, as well as immune-dependent lytic reactions. We also use cell culture methods to examine the effect of permuting specific TGFβ-related proteins of the physiology on vascular smooth muscle cells derived from our mouse models.

Candidates should have experience with mouse breeding, cell biology and/or biochemistry. 

Our laboratory is located on the NYU Langone campus at 31st Street and First Avenue in midtown Manhattan. We collaborate with several groups within NYU School of Medicine as well as groups at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine and Yale University Medical School. We provide an exciting and stimulating scientific atmosphere with emphasis on the mechanistic and translational aspects of growth factor, matrix, and vascular biology. We provide a competitive salary and excellent benefits.

Applicants should send a CV, a letter describing research experience and career goals, the names and contact information for three individuals who can serve as references, and expected date of availability to Dr. Daniel Rifkin at daniel.rifkin@nyumc.org.

Ion Channels in Immunity to Infection, Tumors, and Autoimmunity—September 21, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Stefan Feske, MD, at NYU Langone’s Experimental Pathology Program. The Feske Lab has long-standing expertise in investigating calcium signaling pathways in cells of the immune system. We study the molecular regulation of calcium release-activated channels (CRAC)  formed by ORAI and stromal interaction molecule (STIM) proteins and investigate their role in the physiology of immune and other cells.

We use mice with targeted deletion of CRAC channels and human patients with mutations in CRAC channel genes to investigate how calcium signals control immune responses to infection and tumors, and in autoimmunity and inflammation (e.g., multiple sclerosis and colitis). Other ion channels also regulate T cell-mediated immunity to pathogens, tumors, and self. The Feske Lab is characterizing ion channels that control these immune responses.

We are seeking motivated and creative postdoctoral researchers who have recently earned a PhD or MD/PhD and who are interested in pursuing projects in the area of ion channels in immunity and inflammation. We are part of the world-class immunology research community at NYU Langone Health and its Perlmutter Cancer Center. Our research is published in leading journals including Nature, New England Journal of Medicine, Immunity, Nature Immunology, Nature Communications, The Journal of Experimental Medicine, The Journal of Clinical Investigation, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Candidates should have a strong background in T cell function that includes experience in analyzing T cell-mediated immune responses in vivo using mouse models. Candidates with experience in ion channel function in immune cells or other cell types are especially encouraged to apply. A background in molecular and cell biology, including recombinant DNA technology, is desired. Please send a cover letter explaining relevant work experience and interests, a CV, and the contact information of three references to Dr. Feske at feskes01@nyumc.org.

Cell Fate Determination and Synapse Formation—September 19, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Jessica E. Treisman, PhD, at NYU Langone’s Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine. The Treisman Lab uses the visual system of Drosophila, a type of fruit fly, as a model to understand how cell–cell signaling and intrinsic transcriptional networks drive cells in the nervous system to adopt different fates, and how these neurons then identify the correct synaptic partners and assemble functional circuits.

We are seeking a motivated and creative postdoctoral researcher who is interested in pursuing a project related to these topics. The Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine offers a highly collaborative research environment located in the heart of New York City.

Candidates should have recently obtained or be about to obtain a PhD in a field of biological science and should have a strong publication record. Experience in genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell culture and/or imaging would be an advantage. Please send a CV, statement of research interests, and contact information for three references to Dr. Treisman at jessica.treisman@med.nyu.edu.

Secretion of Exosomes, a Neuroprotective Mechanism in Alzheimer’s Disease—September 8, 2017

Postdoctoral positions are available immediately in the laboratory of Efrat Levy, PhD, for outstanding, highly motivated postdoctoral research fellows to play a major role in state-of-the-science integrative studies of Alzheimer’s disease and related neurodegenerative conditions.

The projects for these positions focus on the following:

(a) defining the mechanisms regulating exosome generation, secretion, and their content, and to test the hypothesis that pathogenic alterations of the endosomal/lysosomal pathway in Alzheimer’s disease disrupt brain exosome release. Furthermore, this study aims to demonstrate that restoring normal exosome production may be an innovative therapeutic approach for reducing endosomal/lysosomal pathway pathology in Alzheimer’s disease.

(b) Studying our hypothesis that the interaction between the Italian amyloid beta, which contains an amino acid substitution at residue 2 of amyloid beta, and wild-type amyloid beta hinders amyloid beta oligomerization, amyloidogenesis and neurotoxicity, and investigate the mechanism(s) by which Italian amyloid beta is protective. The proposed research will develop exosomes as vehicles to deliver protective Italian amyloid beta within the brain, a novel therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease.

These studies routinely employ multidisciplinary approaches including behavioral tests of mouse models, mouse and human postmortem immunohistochemistry, biochemical analyses, including Western blot and ELISA, and in vitro models of Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Levy’s laboratory is located at the Center for Dementia Research at Nathan S. Kline Institute, an affiliate of NYU School of Medicine. The institute is a world-renowned facility for research on Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders situated close to New York City, providing a unique research and training opportunity to combine molecular, morphologic, and in vitro and in vivo approaches in a multidisciplinary setting.

Applicants must have a recent PhD or the equivalent and must have a strong research background as evidenced by peer-reviewed publications in international journals.

To apply, please send a full CV, a brief statement of current research and long-term goal, and names and contact information of three references to Dr. Levy at efrat.levy@nyumc.org.

Neuromodulation of Motor Skill Learning—August 22, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of Heidi Schambra, MD, at NYU Langone’s Department of Neurology and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine (Rusk Rehabilitation).

The Mobilis Lab aims to enhance motor recovery after stroke using targeted physical training, noninvasive brain stimulation, and neuropharmacology. We are currently studying motor skill learning in healthy individuals. We aim to manipulate neural networks in the cortex and brainstem with transcranial electrical stimulation (e.g. tDCS and cranial nerve stimulation) during learning and movement. We also seek mechanistic understanding of behavioral change using TMS neurophysiology and kinematic analysis. Eventually, we will extend our interventions to individuals with stroke undergoing quantitative training. We expect the postdoctoral fellow to lead the development of these projects.

The postdoc’s responsibilities include subject recruitment, acquiring and processing motor-learning data in human subjects, data analysis and synthesis, presenting findings at scientific meetings, writing and submitting manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals, contributing to grant proposals, and mentoring students and visiting fellows. He or she will also gain experience learning about wearable sensor technology.

We seek a motivated and enthusiastic candidate with a keen interest in motor systems neuromodulation and neurophysiology. The candidate must have doctoral experience using noninvasive brain stimulation and/or motor behavioral tasks in humans; the ability to work independently and with a collaborative interdisciplinary team; and be comfortable working with healthy people and people who’ve experienced a stroke. Experience with Python programming language, Igor Pro software, optical motion tracking, movement kinematics, and/or Spanish language proficiency is a plus.

NYU Langone supports the professional development of our postdocs’ academic research career. To apply, submit a CV; a brief cover letter explaining your research experience, interests, goals, and available start date (three pages or less); and the names and contact information of three references who are familiar with your research and academic work to Dr. Heidi Schambra at heidi.schambra@nyumc.org.

Platelets, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease—August 22, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available in the platelet laboratory of Jeffrey S. Berger, MD, MS, at NYU Langone Health’s Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology. Our laboratory is dedicated to elucidating the mechanism and regulation of platelet- mediated complications in atherogenesis, thrombosis, and inflammatory disease states.

Platelets are major players in the fields of thrombosis and hemostasis and inflammation and immune activation. Increased platelet activity contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular dysfunction, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and a heightened inflammatory state. Using a combination of human transcriptional profiling studies, mouse models, and cell culture, we aim to identify novel signaling pathways in platelets that contribute to cardiovascular risk.

The postdoc conducts research to investigate novel and targetable signaling pathways in platelets. The successful candidate joins a dedicated and hardworking team determined to achieve results that change the way we treat cardiovascular disease and other inflammatory diseases.

Ideal candidates hold a PhD and/or an MD in biological sciences or biomedical-related fields and must have a solid background in one or more of the following fields: thrombosis and hemostasis, immunology, and/or genetics. We are looking for a creative and driven individual with a strong publication record and advanced expertise in molecular biology (including reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, or RT-PCR; cloning; immunoprecipitation; and western blotting), flow cytometry, cellular imaging/microscopy, and platelet physiology. Previous experience in high-throughput sequencing, such as RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and assay for transposase-accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq) techniques, is highly desired.

To apply or to obtain more information about the position, please contact Dr. Berger at jeffrey.berger@nyumc.org. Include a CV, brief statement of research background, and the names of three references.

Mechanisms and Treatment of Anxiety, Trauma, and Grief-Related Disorders—August 11, 2017

A post-doctoral psychiatry fellowship is available July 2018 at NYU Langone’s Anxiety and Complicated Grief Program led by Naomi Simon, MD, MSc. This new clinical research program focuses on improving our understanding and treatment of anxiety and fear-related disorders and complicated grief through clinical investigation and treatment studies. The program intends to leverage the exponential growth in real-time advances in genetics, neurobiology, molecular biology, and psychology to better understand key factors that lead to the development and persistence of anxiety and grief disorders as well as their optimal treatment.

The fellowship is designed to provide comprehensive training in research investigation and clinical care in anxiety, grief, and fear-based disorders including complicated grief, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Ongoing studies at various stages of recruitment and data analysis include clinical trials of pharmacotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and yoga, as well as blood-based biomarker cross-diagnostic research. The lab also applies psychophysiological assessments and fear-conditioning paradigms, emotion perception experiments, real-time monitoring, and sleep-related studies, and collaborates with neuroimaging laboratories.

The postdoctoral fellow has the exciting opportunity to assist in the development of this new program and receives close mentorship and support as he or she continues to develop a professional career in psychiatry and clinical research.

Applicants must have an MD and have completed a residency in psychiatry by July 2018. Competitive applicants have prior experience in relevant clinical care and/or research; a background in related psychology, neuroscience, and/or biological studies; and demonstrated interest in this line of research as exemplified by academic presentations and/or peer-review publications. Those motivated to pursue a career in clinical research to investigate the phenomenology, mechanisms, and treatment of anxiety, fear, and/or grief-related conditions are encouraged to apply.

To apply, email Dr. Simon at naomi.simon@nyumc.org with your CV and a cover letter explaining your interests. Please copy Rebecca Lubin at rebecca.lubin@nyumc.org.

Checkpoints Signaling and Tumor Immunology—August 11, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available in NYU Langone’s Department of Medicine and Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center under the joint mentorship of Adam Mor, MD, PhD, and Mark Philips, MD. The goal of our research is to improve the treatment and outcome of patients with cancers by studying the lymphocyte, the leading cell involved in host response against malignancies. More specifically, we are interested in exploring signaling events related to inhibitory receptors in T cells. The successful candidate will investigate novel and targetable co-receptors signaling pathways in T lymphocytes. The postdoc joins a dedicated and hardworking team determined to reach results that change the way we treat malignancies.

Candidates must have a PhD or MD with a solid background in one or more of the following fields: immunology, cell biology, proteomics (mass spectrometry and data analysis), animal models of tumors, and flow cytometry. Candidates should demonstrate an ability to be creative, be highly motivated, work independently, and have a background in tissue culture, cell biology, and general molecular and biochemical techniques. Experience with confocal imaging is an advantage. Prior postdoctoral experience is acceptable, but not obligatory.

This position is available effective October 1, 2017, and is a one-year appointment renewable for up three years. All applicants must attend an in-person interview in New York City. To apply, send a CV and cover letter describing your scientific experiences to Dr. Mor at adam.mor@nyumc.org.

Wound Repair and Tissue Regeneration—August 3, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Daniel J. Ceradini, MD, at NYU Langone for those seeking to conduct independent biomedical research on tissue repair, tissue regeneration, and tissue transplantation/re-engineering.

We investigate novel methods to modulate stem cells and/or their functional environment using several preclinical models in mice and rats. Specifically, we are interested in the impact of oxygen tension on stem/progenitor function and how this can be exploited to restore vascular regeneration in disease states and facilitate the re-engineering of tissue constructs to generate tolerant replacement parts.

Applicants should have a PhD in biomedical sciences with proficiency in molecular biology and immunohistochemical techniques, have experience in tissue regeneration and repair, and be familiar working with animal models and imaging techniques. Additionally, candidates should be able to guide and supervise students and other lab members.

The postdoc will participate in projects dealing with wound repair and tissue regeneration, as well as tissue transplantation/re-engineering, particularly processes involving mesenchymal stem cells in diabetic and other preclinical rodent models. Specifically, he or she will investigate whether modulation of critical molecular regulators of reactive oxygen species-associated pathways during wound healing affects the function of stem/progenitor populations. He or she will also corroborate findings from animal models using human tissues.

This study involves maintaining mouse and rat colonies; performing survival surgery; collecting image data from living animals; harvesting mouse/rat tissue; performing and analyzing Western blots, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR); interpreting frozen and paraffin tissue section immunohistochemistry (IHC); and assessing gross phenotypes. The work will entail detailed molecular and phenotypic analyses and preparation of manuscripts for publication.

The specific duties and responsibilities of the postdoc include the following:

  • formulating hypotheses and generating a study design that is appropriate and specific
  • developing and executing experiments and independently analyzing data
  • analyzing and interpreting results in the context of disease pathology
  • applying molecular biology techniques
  • supervising, managing, and maintaining transgenic mouse colonies
  • writing, implementing, and updating mouse and rat protocols in compliance with Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee guidelines
  • maintaining human tissue acquisition protocols in compliance with institutional review board guidelines
  • collaborating with other research staff in lab
  • supervising and training lab members
  • writing and editing manuscripts with relevant literature searches
  • preparing figures and schematic diagrams for publication and presentations
  • writing, editing, and proofreading grant proposals

Please send a cover letter indicating research experience and interests, a CV, and the names and email address of two to three references to Linda Verlin, at linda.verlin@nyumc.org, and Renee McKell, at renee.mckell@nyumc.org.

Transcriptional Networks Regulating Cardiac Rhythm—July 11, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of David S. Park, MD, PhD, at NYU Langone Health’s Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology with a focus on studying gene regulatory networks that govern cardiac excitability and repolarization.

Reliable cardiac rhythm is essential for life. Each heartbeat is generated and propagated by the specialized cardiac conduction system, which is composed of pacemaker cells and the rapidly conducting ventricular conduction system.

Using a combination of mouse models, signal transduction screens, and transcriptional profiling libraries, we identify novel gene regulatory networks that govern the electrical properties of cardiac conduction system cells and working myocytes (Park DS, Fishman GI, Cardiovasc Dev Dis. 2017; Shekhar et al., J Clin Invest. 2016; Park et al., Nat Commun. 2016).

We then study the response of these gene regulatory networks to pathological states, such as myocardial infarction and heart failure, with the goal of generating new therapeutic strategies for heart rhythm disorders.

The ideal candidate holds a PhD and/or an MD in biological sciences or biomedical-related fields. Candidates with expertise in molecular and cellular biology, mouse cardiac physiology, mouse surgical techniques (myocardial infarction surgery or transaortic constriction banding), genome editing, and gene network analysis are particularly encouraged to apply.

To apply or to obtain more information about the position, please contact Dr. Park at david.park@nyumc.org. Applicants should include a CV, brief statement of research background, and the names of three references.

Family Translational Research Group—June 2, 2017

The Family Translational Research Group at NYU College of Dentistry is looking for a talented, hard-working assistant/associate research scientist or postdoctoral fellow with an interest in applying their exceptional data analytic skills to better understand and prevent family maltreatment and improve the lives of military families.

We conduct basic clinical psychology research on topics including:

  • defining maltreatment in ways that can be reliably used by field workers
  • determining how conflict dynamics relate to violence in teen and adult couples
  • examining the effects of family violence on psychological and physical functioning in children
  • furthering our understanding of risk and protective factors for child maltreatment and partner abuse

We are also involved in several large studies examining community-based prevention efforts in both military and civilian populations that involve the full spectrum of research methods including intensive observational tools, epidemiological surveys, and intervention science. We typically have about 8 to 10 active, federally-funded projects.

Led by codirectors Amy M. Smith Slep, PhD, and Richard E. Heyman, PhD, our team includes several PhD-level psychologists, master’s level researchers and counselors, and bachelor’s level research staff.

In addition to data analysis and management, postdoctoral staff are typically involved in several research projects, manage staff and volunteer research assistants, assist with writing grant proposals and reports for funders, and author scientific papers.

Ideal applicants have strong experience in structural equation modeling and analyzing nested, longitudinal data, and are familiar with techniques for handling challenging data.

Applicants must have a PhD in psychology, statistics, or a related field. Strong data analytic experience in advanced correlation and regression methods, structural equation modeling, growth curve models, and multilevel models is essential. Strong working knowledge of Mplus, in addition to at least one other general statistical package, such as SPSS, R, or SAS; fleuncy in Microsoft Office suite; and fluency in oral and written English are required.

Expertise in methods for nonnormal data, intensive longitudinal analysis, power analysis, mixture models, causal inference, psychometrics, sequential and time series analysis, and/or analyzing large datasets is desired, as is experience conducting research on families and/or prevention and grant writing.

Candidates with a variety of education and experiences are welcome to apply. Scientists who join our team can expect great research experience and, depending on your skills and interests, opportunities for publication and grant writing. If applying state-of-the-science analytic models to complex data to innovate research on family maltreatment and related topics in a team environment excites you, we hope you will consider joining us.

We offer excellent benefits. Salary and title are commensurate with qualifications and experience. Please send your application with curriculum vitae, a short summary of interests, and the names and contact information for three references to Angela Marinakis at aem449@nyu.edu.

Hematopoietic/Leukemic Stem Cell Biology—June 2, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available immediately in the Park Lab at NYU School of Medicine for a highly motivated candidate, who is interested in identifying molecular mechanisms that regulate normal and diseased stem cells in the hematopoietic system, to join a fast moving, team-oriented research group.

Areas of interest include hematopoietic stem cell biology (especially during aging), acute leukemias, and the myelodysplastic syndromes. The candidate will identify genes that regulate stem cell function by evaluating normal and disease stem/progenitor cells using a myriad of cutting-edge “omics” approaches. Evaluation of gene function will include extensive use of stem cell transplantation assays, both in mouse models of disease as well as in xenotransplantation models.

Applicants must hold a PhD and/or a MD degree and have strong laboratory and analytical skills, as well as a desire to work with stem cell transplantation models. A record of peer-reviewed publications and good written and oral communication skills are required. Those with prior experience in hematopoietic/leukemia stem cell biology are especially encouraged to apply. Those with strong backgrounds in molecular biology/biochemistry, cancer biology, or computational approaches to evaluate high throughput data are also welcome to apply.

To apply, please submit your curriculum vitae, a summary of current and future research interests, your expected availability date, a description of past research experience and accomplishments, selected reprints of publications, and three references to Christopher Park, PhD, at christopher.park@nyumc.org.

NYU School of Medicine is an equal opportunity employer with a strong commitment to enhancing the diversity of its faculty and staff. Women and applicants from diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Atherosclerosis in Diabetes—May 25, 2017

A postdoctoral position with a focus on atherosclerosis in diabetes is available immediately in the Diabetes Research Program at NYU School of Medicine. Our program is dedicated to elucidating the mechanisms of diabetic complications, particularly in the progression and regression of atherosclerosis.

We develop multidimensional approaches to examine mechanisms at play when the aorta responds to stress or injury in diabetes and develop therapeutic strategies to prevent, slow, or reverse the progression of diabetic atherosclerosis. Postdoctoral fellows train with a highly collaborative and talented group of pre- and postdoctoral research scientists and other researchers.

Ideal applicants have a doctoral degree, either a PhD or an MD/PhD, and solid experience with contemporary techniques in the study of atherosclerosis with emphasis on measuring atherosclerosis in the whole aorta and at the aortic root, measuring cholesterol and triglycerides, and inducing and measuring diabetes in mice.

Experience with cellular and molecular techniques, including the isolation of primary cells from the mouse atherosclerotic plaques is essential. Expertise in breeding and genotyping mice, preparing mRNA protein lysates from tissues and cells, performing real-time PCR and Western blotting, and knowledge of the principles to be applied for RNA-seq analyses are necessary.

Desired skills include expertise in flow cytometry and fluorescent-activated cell sorting.
Highly motivated candidates who are enthusiastic about science, learn quickly, think creatively and independently, and work efficiently should apply.

Send your CV, a list of three suggested references, and a short statement describing your experience, goals, and reasons for your interest in the position to Ann Marie Schmidt, MD, at annmarie.schmidt@nyumc.org.

Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes—May 25, 2017

A postdoctoral position in the field of diabetic cardiovascular disease is available immediately in the Diabetes Research Program at NYU School of Medicine.

Our program develops multidimensional approaches to examine the mechanisms involved in cardiovascular response to stress or injury in diabetes and apply this knowledge to develop therapeutic strategies to prevent, slow, or reverse the progression of diabetic cardiovascular disease. Postdoctoral fellows train within a highly collaborative and talented group of pre- and postdoctoral research scientists and other researchers.

Ideal applicants have a doctoral degree, either a PhD or a MD/PhD, and solid experience with contemporary techniques in the study of cardiovascular disease with emphasis on cardiovascular physiology. Expertise with cardiac surgery, vascular surgery, and measuring cardiovascular function in mice is essential. Knowledge of the prevailing hypothesis and mechanisms underlying cardiovascular dysfunction in diabetes is required. Experience with cellular and molecular techniques, as well as the use of proteomics and/or metabolomics is preferred.

 Additional skills include breeding and genotyping mice, preparing mRNA protein lysates from tissues and cells, performing real-time PCR and Western blotting, and understanding principles of RNA-seq analyses.

Desired skills include expertise in flow cytometry and fluorescent-activated cell sorting.
Highly motivated candidates who are enthusiastic about science, learn quickly, think creatively and independently, and work efficiently should apply.

Send your CV, a list of three suggested references, and a short statement describing your experience, goals, and reasons for your interest in the position to Dr. Ravichandran Ramasamy at ravichandran.ramasamy@nyumc.org.

Kidney Disease in Diabetes—May 25, 2017

A postdoctoral position in the field of diabetic kidney disease is available immediately in the Diabetes Research Program at NYU School of Medicine. Our program elucidates the mechanisms of diabetic complications involving the kidney. Postdoctoral fellows train within a highly collaborative and talented group of pre- and postdoctoral research scientists and other researchers.

We develop multidimensional approaches to examine the mechanisms involved in the kidney’s response to stress or injury in diabetes and apply this knowledge to develop therapeutic strategies for preventing, slowing, or reversing the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

Ideal applicants have either a PhD or a MD/PhD and solid experience with contemporary techniques involved in the study of diabetic kidney disease, particularly inducting and measuring diabetes in mice and assessing kidney function using metabolic cages. Experience with cellular and molecular techniques, including the isolation of primary cells from the mouse kidney is essential. Additional skills include breeding and genotyping mice, preparing mRNA protein lysates from tissues and cells, performing real-time PCR and Western blotting, and understanding principles of RNA-seq analyses.

Desired skills include expertise in flow cytometry and fluorescent-activated cell sorting.  Highly motivated candidates who are enthusiastic about science, learn quickly, think creatively and independently, and work efficiently should apply.

Send your CV, a list of three suggested references, and a short statement describing your experience, goals, and reasons for your interest in the position to Ann Marie Schmidt, MD, at annmarie.schmidt@nyumc.org.

Genome Editing to Treat Cardiac Diseases—April 11, 2017

A postdoctoral position is available immediately in the laboratory of Chengzu Long, PhD, at NYU School of Medicine’s Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology. Our projects focus on advancing the novel genome editing technology to model and treat cardiac and neuromuscular diseases (Long et al., JAMA Neurology. 2016).

The recent advance in novel precision genome editing technologies and human pluripotent stem cell biology are revolutionizing our approach to studying disease pathology and developing potential therapeutics. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) genome editing, we successfully prevented muscular dystrophy in a mouse model (Long et al., Science. 2014; Long et al., Science. 2016). Recently, we began optimizing genome-editing strategies on the culprit genes in patients’ cardiomyocytes and in animal models (Zhang et al. Science Advances. 2017).

The ideal candidate will hold a PhD and/or an MD in biological sciences or biomedical-related fields. Candidates with expertise in molecular and cellular biology, genome editing, and stem cell biology are particularly encouraged to apply.

To apply or to obtain more information about the position, please contact Dr. Long at chengzu.long@nyumc.org. Applicants should include a CV, brief statement of research background, and the names of three references.