Division of Emergency Medicine Critical Care | NYU Langone Health

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Department of Emergency Medicine Divisions Division of Emergency Medicine Critical Care

Division of Emergency Medicine Critical Care

The Division of Emergency Medicine Critical Care, part of the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine at NYU Langone Health, is one of a growing number of divisions in the country staffed by physicians with expertise in both emergency medicine and critical care.

We believe that this combined proficiency generates valuable cross-disciplinary perspectives, resulting in improved patient care in our emergency departments (EDs) and intensive care units (ICUs), particularly during the transition of care from an ED to an ICU.

Our six full-time faculty are board-certified in both disciplines and treat patients at NYU Langone’s Ronald O. Perelman Center for Emergency Services, Kimmel Pavilion, and NYU Langone Hospital—Brooklyn. These clinical sites include adult and pediatric EDs, as well as medical, surgical, and cardiothoracic ICUs.

Emergency Medicine Critical Care Education

We care for more than 500,000 patients every year in our busy urban EDs and ICUs, making our hospitals excellent clinical training environments for emergency medicine residents starting their careers. Trainees interested in emergency medicine critical care are mentored by our faculty, who help them develop the skills they need to excel in this unique specialty.

Our curriculum includes a critical care interest group, a quarterly critical care journal club, critical care and emergency medicine lectures, and a monthly critical care morning report. We also lead a combined ED–ICU conference, in which an emergency medicine resident and a critical care fellow present the same case from different perspectives, prompting discussion about how the two disciplines can inform and advance each other.

Additionally, we are creating a dedicated critical care track for emergency medicine residents who are strongly considering fellowship training, a career in critical care, or both. The critical care track will be a formal pathway that includes clinical rotations, structured mentorship, meetings and didactic sessions, and a scholarly project.

Our faculty lead lectures on a range of topics at NYU Langone’s modern simulation facility, the New York Simulation Center for the Health Sciences, where trainees conduct simulation sessions and collaborate with medical teams across emergency medicine divisions. We also lead simulation sessions at NYU Langone Hospital—Brooklyn for physician assistants.

Emergency Medicine Critical Care Research

Our faculty and residents pursue interdisciplinary research projects focused on identifying ways to enhance emergency medicine and critical care. Our research often addresses how to improve care for critically ill patients in the ED and the ICU and how to ensure that we maintain the highest quality of care as these patients transition between the ED and the ICU.

Ongoing research interests and related initiatives include early initiation of palliative care in the ED; targeted fluid resuscitation strategies for patients in septic shock; leveraging the electronic health record to ensure timely completion of bundled care in sepsis and administration of second dose antibiotics; and utilizing machine learning algorithms to help identify patients at risk of deterioration and who would benefit from subsequent targeted monitoring.

Our faculty will also soon launch a project evaluating the effectiveness of a mentorship program that goes beyond institutional walls for trainees interested in emergency medicine and critical care. Other planned projects investigate how to improve care for patients experiencing renal trauma and how to best approach emergency airway management.

Emergency Medicine Critical Care Faculty

Catherine Jamin, MD
Director, Division of Emergency Medicine Critical Care
Vice Chair, Clinical Operations, and Chief of Service, Ronald O. Perelman Center for Emergency Services
Clinical Associate Professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine

Gregg Chesney, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine

Susan H. Cheng, MD, MPH
Clinical Assistant Professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine

Cassidy Dahn, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine

Ashika Jain, MD
Clinical Associate Professor, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine