General Internal Medicine & Clinical Innovation Clinical Trials | NYU Langone Health

Skip to Main Content
Division of General Internal Medicine & Clinical Innovation Research General Internal Medicine & Clinical Innovation Clinical Trials

General Internal Medicine & Clinical Innovation Clinical Trials

Division of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Innovation faculty are collaborating with key NYU Langone researchers on National Institutes of Health–funded clinical trials to answer important questions related to COVID-19, opioid dependence, and chronic diseases.

Investigators are also active in a number of different research focus areas, Program for Medical Education Innovations and Research projects, and hospitalist quality improvement and safety initiatives.

Finding a Vaccine for COVID-19

The general internal medicine team is on the front lines of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine development. Mark J. Mulligan, MD, and his team are expanding the reach of NYU Langone’s Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit and created four new sites that include NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue, the VA NY Harbor Healthcare System, NYU Langone Hospital—Brooklyn, and NYU Langone Hospital—Long Island to participate in large-scale clinical trials of COVID-19 vaccine candidates. Our ultimate goal is to end this pandemic.

Each site has a dedicated research team, led by general internal medicine and infectious disease faculty, to conduct clinical trials. The following investigators are leading COVID-19 vaccine research teams at each location:

Addressing the U.S. Opioid Epidemic in Incarcerated Adults

The majority of opioid users who leave jail or prison inevitably return to their homes and communities untreated and prone to relapse. Researchers Barbara Porter, MD, Ann R. Garment, MD, and Joshua D. Lee, MD, seek to assess the efficacy of two medications used to treat opioid dependence, extended release formulations of buprenorphine and naltrexone, among adults incarcerated in U.S. jails and prisons.

The researchers hope that providers, correctional and public health authorities, payers, and policy makers are able to use these data to assess the effectiveness of these medications for re-entry treatment. We believe the findings could have important implications for limiting societal costs of heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioid addictions. This study is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse as part of The Helping to End Addiction Long-term Initiative (HEAL Initiative).

Optimizing Pharmacotherapy Strategies for Opioid Use Disorder

Mathew B. Kladney, MD, is collaborating with John Rotrosen, MD, in the Department of Psychiatry to test strategies to improve opioid use disorder (OUD) pharmacotherapy treatment and retention, and to improve outcomes among patients who have been stabilized successfully on OUD medications and want to stop medication. They also are examining the difference in outcomes with the use of a smartphone-based motivational app. This study is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse as part of The Helping to End Addiction Long-term Initiative (HEAL Initiative).

Behavioral Economics Trial to Enhance Regulation of Blood Pressure

Natalie Levy, MD, is working with cardiologist and principal investigator John A. Dodson, MD, MPH, to determine if a lottery incentive program that is accessible via smartphone can promote better adherence to antihypertensive medications.

The pragmatic randomized clinical trial, known as the Behavioral Economics Trial to Enhance Regulation of Blood Pressure (BETTER-BP), examines the efficacy of the program among a diverse patient population at the NYC Health and Hospitals System, the largest public hospital system in the United States.

The results could lead to sustainable and scalable strategies to improve antihypertensive adherence and blood pressure control among socioeconomically vulnerable patients. This study is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.