Division of Advanced Research Technologies | NYU Langone Health

Skip to Main Content
Scientific Cores & Shared Resources Division of Advanced Research Technologies

Division of Advanced Research Technologies

NYU Langone's Division of Advanced Research Technologies comprises core laboratories that are dedicated to facilitating basic, clinical, and translational research. Our scientists collaborate across academic disciplines and with partnering investigators from outside institutions and laboratories.

Our team members recognize that the most complex problems in biomedical research require complex solutions—powerful technologies employed by experts who personify the ethos of collaboration as they conduct their studies with precision.

A diverse committee of faculty, core directors, and administrators provides strategic guidance, ensuring that our technology and practices enable our partners to perform more robust research.

What's New

Our core laboratories partner with the research community on many noteworthy studies. Below are some highlights.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Releases Publication Regarding Shared Resources

Contemporary science has become increasingly multidisciplinary and team-based, resulting in unprecedented growth in biomedical innovation and technology over the last several decades. A major contributing factor to the success of team science is the mobilization of core facilities and shared research resources (SRRs), the scientific instrumentation and expertise that exist within research organizations that enable widespread access to advanced technologies for trainees, faculty, and staff. For more than 40 years, SRRs have played a key role in accelerating biomedical research discoveries, yet a national strategy that addresses how to leverage these resources to enhance team science and achieve shared scientific goals is noticeably absent. We believe a national strategy for biomedical SRRs—led by the National Institutes of Health—is crucial to advance key national initiatives, enable long-term research efficiency, and provide a solid foundation for the next generation of scientists. Learn more about our paper published in the FASEB Journal.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Releases Shared Research Resources Report

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) released its final report, "Maximizing Shared Research Resources—Part III: Addressing Systemic Challenges and Opportunities." In Part III, the FASEB Shared Research Resources (SRRs) Task Force, co-chaired by Sheenah M. Mische, PhD, identifies five key objectives fundamental to advancing SRRs and their impact on biomedical research progress:

  • improve institutional stewardship of SRRs
  • expand access to SRRs
  • grow a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive SRR workforce
  • increase and sustain investments in SRRs
  • prioritize sustainability in SRR decision-making

To achieve these goals, the report provides implementation strategies for institutions, funding agencies, and other stakeholders to promote SRRs and their role in enhancing research productivity. For example, Section I of the report, “Regional, Institutional, and National Strategies,” underscores the need for partnerships both within institutions and across institutional boundaries. By developing regional SRR capabilities—such as through regional training opportunities and internships—institutions can foster equitable access to SRRs. Coordinated partnerships are particularly important for expanding SRR access to early- and mid-career scientists and underrepresented minority researchers.

The report also emphasizes funding agencies’ unique position to lead by example in supporting and incentivizing resource sharing. Among other recommendations, Section II of the report, “Role of Stakeholders and Funding Agencies,” discusses the need for funding agencies to expand existing mechanisms such as the National Institutes of Health's G20 and C06 grant mechanisms and the National Science Foundation's Major Research Instrumentation Program to drive innovation. Similarly, funding agencies could integrate incentives for the SRR workforce to educate future scientists about SRR career opportunities.

Recommendations are compiled in the final section of the report as summary tables with suggested actions for stakeholders, institutions, small institutions, and funding agencies. Learn more about SRRs and their contribution to scientific progress.

Protein Found to Control Drivers of Normal Growth and Cancer

Researchers have found a long-sought enzyme that prevents cancer by enabling the breakdown of proteins that drive cell growth and cause cancer when disabled. A recent collaboration between Michele Pagano, MD, and the Metabolomics Laboratory, which was published in Nature, elucidated the molecular mechanism governing the destruction of key cell-cycle proteins, D-type cyclins. This mechanism might underlie the lack of response of some human tumors to an inhibitor treatment.

Learn more about this paper at the Nature Blog, “Behind the Paper,” and in Nature's “News and Views”.

Division of Advanced Research Technologies Administration

""

Adriana Heguy, PhD

Assistant Dean, Division of Advanced Research Technologies
adriana.heguy@nyulangone.org

'""

Sheenah Mische, PhD

Senior Director, Division of Advanced Research Technologies
sheenah.mische@nyulangone.org

""

Brianna Alvarez, BA

Program Coordinator, Division of Advanced Research Technologies
brianna.alvarez@nyulangone.org

""

Susana Esquenazi, BS

Senior Program Coordinator, Division of Advanced Research Technologies
susana.esquenazi@nyulangone.org

""

Todd Monroe

Program Coordinator, Division of Advanced Research Technologies
todd.monroe@nyulangone.org

""

Tom Winner, MBA

Director, Finance and Administration, Office of Science and Research
thomas.winner@nyulangone.org

Division of Advanced Research Technologies Advisory Committee

Jef Boeke, PhD
Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Director, Institute for Systems Genetics

Bruce Cronstein, MD
The Dr. Paul R. Esserman Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine
Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology and Department of Pathology
Director, Program in Collaborative Research, Division of Translational Medicine, and Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Glenn Fishman, MD
The William Goldring Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine
Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology and Department of Neuroscience and Physiology
Vice Chair, Research, Department of Medicine
Director, Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology

Ruth Lehmann, PhD
The Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Professor of Cell Biology and Chair, Department of Cell Biology
Director, Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine
Director, Kimmel Center for Stem Cell Biology

Benjamin Neel, MD, PhD
Professor, Department of Medicine
Director, Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center

Richard Tsien, DPhil
The Druckenmiller Professor of Neuroscience and Chair, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology
Professor, Department of Neurology
Director, Neuroscience Institute

Itai Yanai, PhD
Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Director, Institute for Computational Medicine

Terms and Conditions

Please refer to the Terms and Conditions governing the provision of shared core biomedical research services by NYU Grossman School of Medicine. The services are provided by us on an "as is" and "as available" basis and without any express or implied warranties.